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Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals Visiting Restrictions - Important COVID-19 Update

To protect patients, visitors and staff, the Trust has taken the decision to restrict visiting to all inpatient areas at Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals until further notice. Please click here for the answers to frequently asked questions on the new visiting arrangements.

 

For guides to each hospital, please click on the links below:

 

This will reduce the number of people passing through the hospital and offer the maximum opportunity to reduce transmission of COVID-19.

In line with these measures, we have closed off access to our disabled car park. Please be assured we have extra measures in place for emergency access and additional staffing assembled in key locations.

We would like to thank all patients and visitors for their support, patience and co-operation. We appreciate these restrictions and measures will cause concern but our focus is to maintain patient safety and prevent spread of infection.

 

Keeping you safe when visiting ASPH

As we move into the next stage of the COVID-19 pandemic we are restoring and recovering our services and safety for you and our team remains our absolute priority.

With this in mind we have made significant changes at our sites in line with government regulations. However we also need your support with these measures too. So please watch our short animation and read our information sheet. Thank you for your support and patience in following the guidance and helping to keep everyone safe.

 

The use of face coverings when visiting hospital

People infected with COVID-19 can have very mild or no respiratory symptoms (asymptomatic) and can transmit the virus to others without being aware of it.

In line with recent recommendations from the World Health Organisation, we are introducing new measures at Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals to keep visitors, patients, and staff safe.

From Monday, 15th June 2020 you will need to wear a face covering when you come to hospital as a visitor or outpatient.

 

What does this mean for me?

We can all play a role in reducing the spread of coronavirus and keeping our hospitals safe. If you are coming to hospital as a visitor or for planned outpatient care, it is important that you wear a face covering at all times. This is for your safety and the safety of other patients and staff.

Face coverings can be cloth and/or homemade, and advice on how to wear and make one can be found on the government website. Face coverings worn as part of religious beliefs or cultural practice are also acceptable, providing they are not loose and cover the mouth and nose.

We are asking that you plan in advance and bring a face covering with you whenever possible, but if you do not have one available when you come to hospital, you will be provided with one on arrival.

If you are currently shielding and have been provided with a surgical face mask for your appointments, please continue to use this. If you have not been provided with a surgical face mask, you should wear a face covering.

All visitors will be expected to comply with existing social distancing and hand hygiene measures in addition to the face coverings while in the hospital setting.

 

Patient Resources

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect your lungs and airways. It's caused by a virus called coronavirus.

For all the latest information including the risk of COVID-19 in the UK, advice for travelers, symptoms of Coronavirus, how it is spread and advice around public places and self-isolation visit the NHS website.

In this section:

 

When to self-isolate

Self-isolate if:

  • you have any symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature, a new, continuous cough or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste)
  • you're waiting for a coronavirus test result
  • you've tested positive for coronavirus – this means you have coronavirus
  • you live with someone who has symptoms, is waiting for a test result or has tested positive

There is separate advice if you're told by NHS Test and Trace that you've been in contact with a person with coronavirus available here.

For information about self-isolating when you travel or return to the UK, see GOV.UK: how to self-isolate when you travel to the UK.

 

How to self-isolate

Don't

  • do not go to work, school or public places – work from home if you can
  • do not go on public transport or use taxis
  • do not go out to get food and medicine – order it online or by phone, or ask someone to bring it to your home
  • do not have visitors in your home, including friends and family – except for people providing essential care
  • do not go out to exercise – exercise at home or in your garden, if you have one

 

How long to self-isolate

If you have symptoms of coronavirus, you'll usually need to self-isolate for at least 7 days.

If you live with someone who has symptoms, you'll usually need to self-isolate for 14 days.

Read more about how long to self-isolate.

 

How to avoid spreading the infection

It's very important to do what you can to reduce the risk of you and other people getting ill with coronavirus.

You can spread the virus even if you do not have symptoms.

 

Do

  • stay at least 2 metres (3 steps) away from anyone you do not live with when outside your home
  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • wash your hands as soon as you get home
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • if you can, wear something that covers your nose and mouth when it's hard to stay away from people, such as in shops or on public transport

 

Don't

  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

 

Advice for people at high risk

All the latest information and advice for people at higher risk from coronavirus can be found here.

 

Pregnancy advice

If you're pregnant and worried about coronavirus, you can get advice about coronavirus and pregnancy from the Royal College of Obstretricians and Gynaecologists.

 

Outpatients and Imaging Appointments Update

The majority of outpatient appointments will be virtual – either via telephone or video. We are in the process of moving as many appointments as possible over to a video format using a system called Attend Anywhere. You will receive a letter, phone call or text message to confirm when and how your appointment will take place.

Face-to-face appointments will only take place where they deemed clinically essential and the majority, including imaging appointments, will take place at Ashford Hospital.

If you have any questions about your appointment please call 01784 884361.

 

COVID-19 Donations

In these worrying times, the generosity of people and businesses from our community has been truly amazing. We are so grateful for all of the contributions and donations that have been made to support our staff.

We are making arrangements to ensure these donations reach the team and vulnerable members of our community; so that you can be sure your generosity is really being put to good use.

We don’t want anyone to put themselves at risk in order to support us, so here are a few pointers if you want to help ... find out more